Receptors rewired

Does buprenorphine treat depression? Is my depression from Suboxone? Will Suboxone treat bipolar? Will naltrexone or Vivitrol make me depressed?
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wannaBdrugfree
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Receptors rewired

Post by wannaBdrugfree » Sat Aug 11, 2018 11:03 am

Is buprenorphine healing your receptors or I’ve heard the term rewiring. In other words, if full agonists like oxycodone, hydrocodone, etc. had been used to often, what damage has occurred to your receptors and how does buprenorphine benefit or maybe heal them?

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Amy-Work In Progress
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Re: Receptors rewired

Post by Amy-Work In Progress » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:55 pm

From what I understand the mu receptors in our brains are not actually harmed during addiction. However, they do proliferate, meaning that the brain makes more mu receptors. Tolerance develops because you need more of the opioid to fill up all of the new receptors.

The addiction to opioids comes in the form of changes to the pleasure/reward system of the brain. The most primitive part of our brains, which some call the lizard brain, memorizes the things that bring pleasure. For example, when we eat, that part of our brain recognizes and remembers the feeling of being full and satisfied and wants to repeat it.

Unfortunately, opioids are recognized by this same system as life sustaining instead of harmful. Once the neural pattern is set the addict's brain, it is there for a lifetime. We will always be susceptible to relapse. Working a recovery program with buprenorphine is the one of the best ways to prevent relapse, and this is based on scientific research.

About the "healing" that happens in the brain. Like I said, I don't think receptors become damaged. The change in receptors is that more are created. Another change is that the production of your own endorphins is compromised. So if "healing" occurs I believe that receptors are down-regulated and endorphins are up-regulated. I haven't looked into the science of this in quite a while, but I believe that this represents the best guesstimate of what happens after active addiction.

I'm going to research this a bit and if I can clarify anything, I will. If I'm totally wrong, I also hope that another regular knows more about this.

Amy
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